Why Rotational Grazing Makes Sense

Rotational grazing is a practice that has been put in place because it has proven a very economical option for cattle-raising farmers. On the surface it is the ultimate way to feed cattle which are managed for human consumption, but rotational grazing has been quite a revelation in that it has served other purposes.

Image source: transterraform.com

Proper management of grazing would entail that cattle be raised on specific areas within the pasture, called paddocks. This has resulted in a systematic renewal of nutrients from the soil. In other words, this kind of grazing involves alternating between periods of rest and availability on the turf.

There is a thickening effect on grass when it is grazed to a certain height and it is induced to grow laterally and take root. The growth becomes more dense and the grass independently finds its way to vacant top soil so that it could expand its foothold.

Rotation ensures manageable growth. While the cows are fed, the grass is grown neither too high and nor too low, leaving it generally free of unwanted elements like other small animals and insects.

When cows eat, they also produce manure, which is a very potent fertilizer. The genius of this is that it is built in as a manure management tool in the rotational grazing system.

This is clearly a win-win situation for grass and cattle. Grass is managed well as it spreads evenly throughout the pasture, as the farmer gets to enjoy a growing real estate that can accommodate more cows.

Image source: agric.wa.gov.au

Geoffrey Morell raises livestock in P.A. Bowen Farmstead, which is known for having the most relevant rotational grazing practices. To know more about the farm, visit this website.

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