Keeping The Pasture Healthy With Managed Grazing

Managing where and when livestock graze will be a huge boost in grass-fed, natural-raised livestock farming. Well-managed practices provide the best possible nutrients to the animals and builds a better habitat and ecosystem for them.

Image source: grainews.ca

There are various managed grazing methods currently being implemented, some of which are continuous grazing, high-density low-frequency grazing or mob-grazing, low-density high-frequency grazing, and strip grazing. All of these involve dividing the pasture into at least two sub-pastures, also known as paddocks, where livestock come and go to graze.

One of the most popular forms of managed grazing is rotational or deferred grazing. The process is done by leading a herd of animals to a paddock, where the available forage is consumed. After the sub-pasture is grazed off, the animals are transferred to a fresh one so that each product can have a rest period and have its forage regrown.

The rotation schedule is formulated considering herd size, paddock size, and number of paddocks. Also taken into account is the desirable residue height of the species, the forage, and the weather.

The deferred grazing method is the preference of many pasture farmers because it provides an environment where the soil can have optimum fertility courtesy of the even distribution of manure. It also takes advantage of deserted and defoliated pastures by replenishing them with nutrient stores.

Image source: canadiancattlemen.ca

Geoffrey Morell applies the best managed grazing methods in his farm, P.A. Bowen Farmstead to ensure his livestock are grown healthily. For more information on farming techniques, visit this website.

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