Pesticide Alternatives For a Healthier Farm

People are becoming more and more health conscious nowadays. They are increasingly interested in what they eat. For vegetables, many health buffs have grown sensitive to the presence of “additives,” specifically pesticides. Most pesticides are usually frowned upon due to their chemical nature. Here are some alternatives to using pesticides that farmers could consider:

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Image source: permaculturenews.org

Crop Rotation

Growing different types of crops in an area in a seasonal pattern not only reduces the need for pesticide, it also protects the farm from soil erosion, while boosting soil fertility, and ultimately the yield. This is also a good way to preserve nutrients that would otherwise be depleted if the same crops were planted over and over.

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Image source: greenblender.com

Organic Farming

This is fairly new compared to other methods. Organic farming is in constant development, but it has a proven track record. The philosophy is that organic fertilizers such as compost, manure, and bone meal provide more nutrients than regular farming. It is often used in conjunction with crop rotation. Although biological pest control is recommended, the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides is not. Genetically modified organisms, plant growth regulators, sewage sludge, hormones, as well as livestock antibiotics are also not allowed during the process of organic farming. Organic farming has continually developed, and continues to be defined by novel methods.

Geoffrey Morell co-owns the P.A. Bowen Farmstead with Sally Fallon Morell. Follow this link for more information on the farm’s products and methods.

Rocking The Roquefort: Opening Up To Blue Cheese

Roquefort — it is at once a village in France and a species of fungus (Penicillium roqueforti). But it is most celebrated as a cheese, specifically, the dreaded blue that divides the opinion of gourmands. You either love or hate it, but there’s no two ways to see its health benefits.

Refined palates punctuate meals with a spread of cheeses, accompanied by select wines (preferably rosé). This explains the savory aspect of trying out blue cheese and its regional and global variations at least once. It goes with certain dishes like salads, or as an afterthought to a fine steak.

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Image source : PABowenFarmstead.com

Depending on provenance, combined with the manufacturing and aging process, Roquefort brings to the table anti-inflammatory properties, thanks to ingredients in the process of fermentation. This redounds to cardiovascular health.

But there’s more merit to Roquefort derived from the milk of grass-fed, pasture-raised cows and sheep. The ruminants’ feed in the pasturage, comprised of naturally grown grass and other herbs, facilitates the transfer of essential nutrients through the arising cheese: vitamins such as A, D, K2, and E, and minerals such as calcium and phosphorus. Moreover, such organic methods elude preservatives, GMOs, and artificial chemicals such as coloring agents.

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Image source : Cheese.com

Consumption of blue cheese need not be so intimidating and faint-inducing all the time. Depending on the degree they have perfected their own manufacturing processes, cheese manufacturers can control the aroma and flavor from the resulting blue marbling. This is a sight to behold but can assault olfaction when the creamy character of the resulting cheese is neglected.

The best way to take up the Roquefort challenge is to find a cheese manufacturer enjoying fine word of mouth.

Geoffrey Morell and Sally Fallon Morell are the owners of P.A. Bowen Farmstead, which is dedicated to raising grass-based livestock and producing artisan cheese. The farm produces the award-winning Prince George Blue Cheese, produced from Penicillium roqueforti mold culture, Celtic sea salt, and organic rennet. It is a calm and creamy blue cheese to start with. For more information on the other cheeses produced by P.A. Bowen, visit its website.